Things to consider before choosing a House Name – No Longer Just A custom of the Landed Gentry!

As the nights begin to draw in ready for Winter, people instinctively retreat to the sanctuary of their homes and look to stay snug in their nests over the coming months. This is a perfect time to spruce up your pad and personalise it by choosing a house name as individual as you are.

I’m often asked why people name their houses, especially as it is no longer just a custom of the landed gentry. Historically, older houses were named to reflect their original owners or after a local place in order to identify where they were built so visitors could find them as it was likely to be in a rural location and unlikely to have many other houses in close proximity. Similarly, tradespeople often named their homes after their occupation, an early form of advertising their profession.  As time went on, owners chose names for their houses not just because it sounded pleasant, but also to personalise it.

The 18th and 19th Centuries saw the development of more urban landscapes and that brought the need to introduce a numbering system to identify each house.  Usually, houses on the left-hand side are given odd numbers and those on the right-hand side are assigned even numbers with the lowest numbers closest to the town centre.

Choosing a house name

Homeowners taking pride in their abodes have continued the great British tradition of naming their houses can get their inspiration from a range of sources.  You can get ideas by researching the history of your home, the land it is built on or old family history or professions.  The resulting name may be a nod to its former use, such as ‘The Old Schoolhouse’ or ‘The Bake House’ or a beloved vista such as ‘Hillside View’ or ‘The Cherry Tree’.

Some people use mix of the names of family members to make up a unique and meaningful name,  Others look to the humorous puns of times gone by such as ‘Dunroamin’ or even ‘Toad Hall’, the eponymous home of the popular Kenneth Grahame character in the much loved book, The Wind in the Willows.  A good name will help your home stand out from the crowd in a competitive property market and could add extra value to your home.

Things to consider before Choosing a House Name

What is the most common house name?

In 2021 the most common house name was ‘The Cottage’ closely followed by ‘Woodlands’ and another nod to the past with ‘The Coach House’. Research also found that postcodes in Wales had the highest number of named properties in the United Kingdom.

Do you need permission to name your house?

Anyone can name their house, you don’t need permission from the Post Office or local council authorities so long as you continue to use your given house number, road and post code along with it on all correspendence. You can also change the name of a house, in conjunction with your local authority, but you must keep the identification number incase of an emergency.

In conclusion…

So, no longer for the exclusive use of owners of large estates or manor houses, house names are being adopted across the country by homes of all shapes and sizes by homeowners wanting to give their property this unique, personal touch.

Once you’ve decided on your house name and chosen your font or design, your house name plaque will be handcrafted by me, giving you an individual house name or number plaque.  I can also add an LED light to the finished product, if required, to make your home stand out from the crowd on dark, wintery nights. So why not add one of my glass or slate house numbers or name plaques to your Christmas present ‘Wish List’ – a sophisticated and unique gift that will last for many years to come.

Where can you buy my house name plaques?

Please ask to see some examples of the range of designs and fonts available and I am always happy to work with individuals to create something totally bespoke. You can find more images of my glass and slate house numbers and name plaques, plus information on other products I make, on my website.

Buy glass and slate house name plaques here >

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